The Mapsurfer Quatrains

LOCATION:  Eastern United States

CHALLENGE:  3.5 stars

DATE/NUMBER:  16-Apr-2000/23

MAP: 

I.

Some geographical riddles for you to ponder
To'll corners of the world you'll need to wander
Three and twenty quatrains to trick your mind
Be careful and clever or the box you'll not find

II.

Soon it is time to begin your journey
Each answer does have letters aplenty
But numbers are spelled and spaces ignored
And punctuation finds the cutting room floor

III.

I am lost but never found
Owned by congress and by crown
All around see I both blue and green
I ask you now -- do you know me?

IV.

From the easterly end of the French-Dutch border
Bear thence northwest to a town in short order
Which is found in worlds both old and new
Tell me dear friend -- where are you?

V.

I often dream of a world without borders
Instead pieces of France lie in Canadian waters
Find this place on a map if you can
And of course be careful, use 'et' not 'and'

VI.

In three and sixty a country gets larger
But not via conquest, merger, treaty or barter
Three and twenty hence its big town hosts history
Please name this city to unravel the mystery

VII.

Through land most exotic and ancient I tread
Vexed by the dragon of orange and red
The way be most blessed by peaks of snow
Through which capital and country, then, do I go?

VIII.

Drifting two miles above the sea
The sun and moon our destination be
Where Mu lies lost below unearthly isles
Please name this place that so beguiles

IX.

From Philly to Boston soon I will travel
And my car shall remain on paved roads or gravel
True or False my friend, and do think fast --
Through the Empire State need my vehicle not pass?

X.

The vital rock ventures forth for his queen
To misty thunder he claims to have been
His surname and place in that order give me
And a clue to this puzzle yours shall be

XI.

Sail into tomorrow and thence yesterday
A lonely island be passed by the way
Methinks you're clever and onto my game
I ask my friend -- can you figure my name?

XII.

A place in New Mexico your dentist might climb
Or perhaps your horologist if he feels so inclined
This four-worder is lame, what can I say
A common letter we need so this game we can play

XIII.

What William and Mary under the tree once discovered
Was with little red critters almost totally covered
Below coffee island this place does sit
Are you, my friend, sharp enough to find it?

XIV.

Prepositions exist not in the tongue I speak
And I assure it sounds nothing like Greek
My capital city be called Dane Town
So riddle me this -- where might I be found?

XV.

The canine does come from outer space
And leaves his mark upon this place
His girl Kimberley he comes to visit
Using four words -- tell me what is it?

XVI.

A place as unique as any of earth's
Over one hundred feet to quench your thirst
I ask you now, with cunning or grace --
Are you clever enough to name this place?

XVII.

Leave town any of the three hundred sixty degrees
And the countryside of France I know you shall see
Yet Paris be not my capital city
Guess my village, then country, if you're so witty

XVIII.

The mighty Mississippi is one tricky river
From its source to its mouth a clue it'll deliver
If, my friend, you can pass this quaint test --
Count how many states live both east and west

XIX.

The aviator now rests in his grave
Where the Union Jack here does wave
And the tallest mountain be here too
I ask you my friend -- have you a clue?

XX.

One of the seven rises up from the white
To the north of where patriots you'd sight
Indeed this riddle seems awfully strange
For the clue in two words be the name of its range

XXI.

One exists now where two once were
In the place of frankincense and myrrh
Where Samha to the east now does beckon
This one be easy -- don't you reckon?

XXII.

Our tour of the world now ends at the border
Nineteen answers you've written in order
Eleven score and six letters strung end to end
Its time to decipher -- hang onto your pen

XXIII.

Ninety five numbers find listed below
Each used in order, you'll make the map grow
Which now for the clever truly unlocks
The lost path to the Quatrains Letterbox

149  95  71 216  34   8 201  58 144 174
127  49 184  77 102  42  17  69 202 192
  3  90 117 169 187 215 114  66 103 160
222  18  38 141  84  53  26 156  64  23
134 165  96 121  75  15 205 140 181 123
 56  46 163  91  41 112  61 145   1  87
 73 155 198  52 110 132 122 206 152  67
 40 171 200  12 212 128 107  30 161 217
 85 153  47 170 204  37 183 150  92 116
180 213 172  65 120
NOTE 1:  Off-trail walking is involved.

NOTE 2:  Be wary of snakes and other wildlife when reaching into dark places. No need to dig for this box. All bearings magnetic unless otherwise noted. A pace is a long stride counted on a footfall of either foot, i.e. two paces are counted each time the right foot hits the ground. Be aware of if or when there is game hunting in the area.

NOTE 3:  Please re-hide the thing well just as you found it, and be discreet when stamping up.

DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT:  PERSONS USING THIS CLUE OR HUNTING THIS LETTERBOX DO SO AT THEIR OWN RISK. Do not hunt this letterbox without reading and agreeing to the waiver first. Children, do not hunt this letterbox without the supervision of an adult who has read and agreed to the waiver. Possession of this clue does not imply rights of access to particular lands and route choices, or the safety thereof, including the location of the box itself. Always observe current local regulations, signs, property rights, and customs; you are responsible for your actions. Clue not indended to be taken literally or to suggest route choices; route choices (and the choice to proceed at all), are your choice.
This clue, photographs, and associated stamp art are copyright © 2000, by Randy Hall. Permission to reproduce for personal use granted; all other rights reserved.

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